Switzerland

All.Can around the world

All.Can Switzerland

Cancer care in Switzerland

Switzerland is known for having one of the best healthcare systems in the world. The decentralised structure favours an almost unconstrained choice of providers and a high availability and accessibility of healthcare services. However, this comes at a significant cost: health expenditure in Switzerland is higher than in most Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) countries. This is why international organisations like the World Health Organization and OECD have pointed out that Switzerland’s main challenges lie in becoming more cost-effective.1 Indeed, with the second highest healthcare spending in the world2 and an above-average investment in cancer care of more than 6%,3 Switzerland produces lower health outcomes per money spent compared with other countries.4

Every year, more than 40,000 Swiss citizens are diagnosed with cancer.5 While incidence rates for cancer have remained constant since 1980, mortality rates have dropped by more than 30%. This achievement was possible thanks to medical advances in diagnostic technology, medicines and care.6 Nonetheless, the diagnosis for people with cancer still comes with a high burden for patients as well as their environment. There are countless opportunities across Switzerland to make cancer care more efficient and more sustainable. In particular, cancer care should become more patient-centred, focusing on patient needs and patient-reported outcomes. This is what All.Can Switzerland intends to do.

All.Can Switzerland initiative

All.Can Switzerland defines solutions for sustainable cancer care with a strong focus on improved patient outcomes. This is achieved through an open dialogue and a broad collaboration with all stakeholders.

In April 2018, a group of interested stakeholders met to discuss what All.Can could look like in Switzerland. Out of this meeting, a working group was formed. Under the leadership of the Swiss Cancer Foundation, the working group is currently building the infrastructure for All.Can Switzerland and assessing several projects that will be kicked-off in 2018.

We are actively looking for interested parties to join us. If interested, please get in touch with us: Switzerland@all-can.org

References:

1. OECD. 2011. OECD Reviews of Health Systems – Switzerland, p. 9. http://www.oecd.org/switzerland/oecdreviewsofhealthsystems-switzerland.htm [accessed 18 May 2018]
2. OECD. 2018. Health spending. https://data.oecd.org/chart/5b8O [accessed 18 May 2018]
3. Wieser et al. 2014. Die Kosten der nichtübertragbaren Krankheiten in der Schweiz, Schlussbericht, p. 52. http://bit.ly/zhaw14 [accessed 6 August 2018]
4. OECD. 2018. http://stats.oecd.org/ [accessed 18 May 2018]
5. Heusser et al. 2017. Krebs in der Schweiz, Zahlen Weiterentwicklung der Krebsregistrierung und Folgen, in: Onkologe, 23:588-596. doi: 10.1007/s00761-017-0252-4
6. Federal Office of Statistics/NICER. 2017. Schweizer Krebsbericht 2015. http://bit.ly/Krebsbericht [accessed 6 August 2018]

Disclaimer:

The All.Can initiative is made up of leading representatives of patient organisations, policymakers, healthcare professionals, science and industry. All the publications produced under the initiative reflect the consensus of All.Can members who have full editorial control. The All.Can initiative in Switzerland is supported (financially and/or in kind) by Amgen, Bristol-Myers Squibb, MSD, mysurvivalstory.com, Swiss Cancer Foundation, Lucerne University of Applied Sciences and Arts, and University of Zurich.

All.Can is a trademark of The Health Policy Partnership Ltd.

Working group

Isabel Baur

Isabel Baur

University of Zurich, Competence Center for Medical Ethics and Law Helvetiae

Oliver Kessler

Oliver Kessler

Lucerne University of Applied Sciences and Arts, Competence Center for Public and Nonprofit Management

Damiano Urbinello

Damiano Urbinello

MSD

Martin Inderbitzin

Martin Inderbitzin

My Survival Story Foundation

Nicole Schlumberger

Nicole Schlumberger

Bristol-Myers Squibb

Daniel Widrig

Daniel Widrig

Bristol-Myers Squibb

Partners

Anna Scheliga

Anna Scheliga

Swiss Cancer Foundation

Markus Diener

Markus Diener

Swiss Cancer Foundation