Rapid responses to the COVID-19 pandemic

The importance of efficiency has become more evident than ever following the outbreak of the COVID-19 pandemic. As healthcare systems adapt and restructure to manage the crisis, we must focus on using resources efficiently and effectively to support the fight against COVID-19, minimise the impact of the pandemic on cancer services and patient outcomes, and protect people with cancer, their families and carers from infection. The All.Can efficiency hub hopes to contribute to these efforts by sharing innovative examples of how cancer care is adapting in response to COVID-19.

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Observation units: an alternative to hospital admission for people with cancer

Emergency care departments are typically designed to care for people for up to six hours. However, some people cannot be safely discharged within that timeframe. The Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center set up an observation unit to enable an additional 24 to 48 hours of observational care before hospital admission.

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Supportive care services: support beyond active treatment for people with cancer in Italy

Models of cancer care that focus solely on active treatment leave people with cancer unsupported for a large part of their care pathway. Two centres in Italy set up supportive care services to address this issue.

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The EPIC project: empowering pharmacists to improve adherence to oral anticancer agents

The European Society of Oncology Pharmacy launched the Empowering Pharmacists to Improve Healthcare for Oral Chemotherapy Patients (EPIC) project to establish a European best-practice model for pharmacists dispensing oral anticancer agents.

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The ‘right to be forgotten’: improving access to loans and insurance for cancer survivors

France introduced the ‘right to be forgotten’ law, which states that some cancer survivors are exempt from disclosing their history of cancer to insurers. The ‘right to be forgotten’ aims to reduce the socioeconomic burden on cancer survivors by improving their access to loans and insurance.

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Eurocarers cancer toolkit: supporting informal carers for people with cancer

Eurocarers has created an essential care and cancer toolkit to educate carers about cancer, help carers come to terms with their situation and encourage them to evaluate their needs and seek help. The toolkit is based on research and input from carers, people with cancer and healthcare professionals across the European Union.

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The ESMO Patient Guide on Survivorship: support after primary treatment of cancer

To help address the needs of cancer survivors, the European Society for Medical Oncology (ESMO) developed the Patient Guide on Survivorship. It is directed at survivors and can be used by carers, family, and friends of people who have or previously had cancer, as well as healthcare professionals.

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The Swedish Cancer Registers: using population-based data to monitor and improve cancer control

Sweden was one of the first countries to implement a government-funded national cancer register – a centralised database that collects healthcare information about all people diagnosed with cancer.

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Multidisciplinary cancer care in Belgium: government funding to support multidisciplinary meetings

Miscommunication can have a negative impact on the quality of cancer care delivered to patients, but bultidisciplinary team (MDT) meetings can improve communication between healthcare professionals involved in cancer care.

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